Saint Priest-Martyr Monan of Isle of May & 6.600 Martyrs in Fife, Scotland (+874) – March 1

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

isle of may scotland fde

 

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Ruins of the Monastery of Saint Andrian on Isle of May, Scotland

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Saint Priest-Martyr Monan of Isle of May

& 6.600 Martyrs in Fife, Scotland (+874)

March 1

Saint Monan lived in the 9th century. He was a companion of Martyr Saint Adrian/Ethernan who was Abbot in the Monastery of Isle of May in Scotland.

After the Martyrdom of Saint Andrian of the Monastery of Isle of May by Vikings, Saint Monan went on to Inverey in Fife and set up a chapel.

He martyred with 6.600 Christians by Viginks in Fife, Scotland, on 874.

Saint Monan’s feast day is March 1.

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A letter to a new convert by Mother Thekla, Abbess of  Orthodox Monastery of the Assumpion in North Yorkshire, England

http://conversionstoorthodoxy.wordpress.com

CONVERSIONS TO ORTHODOXY

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A letter to a new convert by Mother Thekla,

Abbess of  Orthodox Monastery of the Assumpion

in North Yorkshire, England

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com/2013/01/mother-theklas-letter-to-a-new-convert/

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

Mother Thekla, who died on Aug. 7, 2011 at aged 93, was the last surviving nun to have occupied the enclosed Orthodox Monastery of the Assumption in North Yorkshire, but became better known to the wider world as the spiritual muse of the composer Sir John Tavener. Mother Thekla wrote the following letter in 2009, when she was 91 years old. You can read more about her here.

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Dear “John”,

I understand that you are on the way to becoming Orthodox. I know nothing about you, beyond the fact that you are English.

Before we go any further, there is one point I should make clear. I have not been told why you are about to convert, but I assure you there is no point whatsoever if it is for negative reasons. You will find as much “wrong” (if not more) in Orthodoxy as in the Anglican or Roman Churches.

So – the first point is, are you prepared to face lies, hypocrisy, evil and all the rest, just as much in Orthodoxy as in any other religion or denomination?

Are you expecting a kind of earthly paradise with plenty of incense and the right kind of music?

Do you expect to go straight to heaven if you cross yourself slowly, pompously and in the correct form from the right side?

Have you a cookery book with all the authentic Russian recipes for Easter festivities?

Are you an expert in kissing three times on every possible or improper occasion?

Can you prostrate elegantly without dropping a variety of stationery out of your pockets?

OR…..

Have you read the Gospels?

Have you faced Christ crucified? In the spirit have you attended the Last Supper – the meaning of Holy Communion?

AND….

Are you prepared, in all humility, to understand that you will never, in this life, know beyond Faith; that Faith means accepting the Truth without proof. Faith and knowledge are the ultimate contradiction –and the ultimate absorption into each other.

Living Orthodoxy is based on paradox, which is carried on into worship – private or public.

We know because we believe and we believe because we know.

Above all, are you prepared to accept all things as from God?

If we are meant, always, to be “happy”, why the Crucifixion? Are you prepared, whatever happens, to believe that somewhere, somehow, it must make sense? That does not mean passive endurance, but it means constant vigilance, listening, for what is demanded; and above all, Love.

Poor, old, sick, to our last breath, we can love. Not sentimental nonsense so often confused with love, but the love of sacrifice – inner crucifixion of greed, envy, pride.

And never confuse love with sentimentality.

And never confuse worship with affectation.

Be humble – love, even when it is difficult. Not sentimental so called love – And do not treat church worship as a theatrical performance!

I hope that some of this makes sense,

With my best wishes,
Mother Thekla
(sometime Abbess of the Monastery of the Assumption, Normanby)

The Father Of Lights – By Constantine Georgiades, England – Journey to Orthodoxy

http://cominghomeorthodoxy.wordpress.com

COMING HOME – ORTHODOXY

england ggghyuuu

The Father Of Lights

By Constantine Georgiades, England

Journey to Orthodoxy

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com/2010/05/the-father-of-lights-constantine-georgiades/

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

A team of 120 members of the London Robbery Squad arrested me, my builder and electrician in Devon on 17th April 1991. I had to strip, put on white paper suit and wait in a cold empty cell for 3 days and then I was charged with various conspiracy offenses and remanded in custody at Exeter Prison. I had often driven past the prison and had never considered that one day I might be a guest of Her Majesty!

As an ex-policeman, I was warned to ask for the ’43’s’ by the escorting officer, but I really hadn’t understood what that meant. A mistake had been made and I felt sure that it was Continue reading “The Father Of Lights – By Constantine Georgiades, England – Journey to Orthodoxy”

Link: Saint Dunstan Orthodox Christian Church in Poole, England

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

http://www.saint-dunstan.org

Saint Dunstan Orthodox Christian Church in Poole, England

A Parish of the Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of the British Isles and Ireland

Patriarchate of Antioch and all the East

Saint Osmund’s Road, Parkstone, Poole, BH14 9JG

Church Phone: 01202 602628

Poole, England

 

Video: Human Relationships in the Light of Christ – Q&A ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* Father Zacharias of Essex Monastery, England

http://easternorthodoxchurch.blogspot.com

EASTERN ORTHODOX CHURCH

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Human Relationships in the Light of Christ

Q&A – Father Zacharias of Essex Monastery, England

“Human Relationships in the Light of Christ”, talk given by Archimandrite Zacharias in the Orthodox Christian Church in Edinburgh, on 8th of November 2012.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

St. John The Baptist, the Orthodox Monastery, Tolleshunt Knights, Essex, England

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If you want go to the St. John the Baptist Monastery and talk with Father Zacharias.

The address is:

The Old Rectory, Rectory Road,

Tolleshunt Knights, By Maldon,

Essex CM9 8EZ, United Kingdom

Tel.: (+44) (0) 1621 816 471

to get there from LONDON

1. go to Liverpool Street Station (you can get there by UNDERGROUND)

2. get a train to WITHAM

3. get a taxi to the monastery of Saint John the Baptist (say Tolleshunt Knights if the taxi driver does not know the monastery)

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FACEBOOK OF MONASTERY ST JOHN BAPTIST ESSEX

 

Finding the Faith of St Joseph of Arimathea: An Interview with Fr. Jonathan Hemmings, England ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* The tradition of faith in Great Britain goes back to the Apostolic era!

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

ORTHODOX HEART

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Finding the Faith of St Joseph of Arimathea:

An Interview with Fr. Jonathan Hemmings, England

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The tradition of faith in Great Britain goes back to the Apostolic era!

by Tudor Petcu

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com/2016/10/finding-the-faith-of-joseph-of-arimathea/

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

A Romanian writer, Tudor is a graduate of the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Bucharest, Romania. He has published a number of articles related to philosophy and theology in different cultural and academic journals. His work focuses on the evolution of Orthodox spirituality in Western societies as well and he is going to publish a book of interviews with Westerners converted to Orthodoxy. In this article, he interviews Fr. Jonathan Hemmings, Orthodox theologian, who is the priest of the Holy Life-Giving Cross Orthodox Church in Lancaster, UK, talks about faith and love in Christ.

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1.) Before discussing your conversion to Orthodoxy, I would appreciate it a lot if you could talk about your main spiritual experiences and journies untill you have discovered the Orthodox Church.

First of all, we need to be sure of what we mean when we use the term convert or “conversion.” We all need to be converted – both those who come from different traditions and confessions and those from traditionally Orthodox countries who are referred to as “cradle Orthodox”. Christianity is not a Philosophy, it is a relationship with the All Holy Trinity. We are converted to Christ and we are received into the (Orthodox) Church through Baptism and/or Chrismation. Sometimes this happens in the other order of events. Those who are Baptised Orthodox as babies need to employ the gift of the Holy Continue reading “Finding the Faith of St Joseph of Arimathea: An Interview with Fr. Jonathan Hemmings, England ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* The tradition of faith in Great Britain goes back to the Apostolic era!”

Fr. Meletios Weber, England: Through Oxford to Orthodoxy ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* England, USA & the Netherlands

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

USA OF MY HEART

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Fr. Meletios Webber

ENGLAND, USA, THE NETHERLANDS

From Protestantism to Orthodoxy

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Through Oxford To Orthodoxy

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com/2010/05/through-oxford-to-orthodoxy/

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

Archimandrite Meletios Webber, of Scottish background, was born in London, and received his Masters degree in Theology from Oxford University, England and the Thessalonica School of Theology, Greece. He also holds an E.D.D. (doctorate) in Psychotherapy from the University of Montana, Missoula. He is the author of two published books: Steps of Transformation; an Orthodox Priest Explores the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous (Conciliar Press, 2003); and Bread and Water, Wine and Oil; an Orthodox Christian Experience of God (Conciliar Press, 2007).

This interview was originally published in Pravoslavnie.ru.

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Fr. Meletios, could you tell us a little about your journey to Orthodoxy in Oxford, and how you became a priest?

I went to Oxford as a theology student in 1968, and very quickly found an Orthodox Church there. The parish priest at the time was Fr. Kallistos Ware, who is now Metropolitan of Diokleia, and the deacon at the time was Fr. Basil Osborne, who is now Bishop of Amphipolis. The parish in Oxford was both a Russian and a Greek one, coexisting in a small room in what had once been the house of the famous Dr. Spooner. I was immediately attracted to the quality of the stillness that I found in that small room. That has been something that I have consistently valued in the Orthodox Church ever since. It is a quality which is difficult to talk about, but it happens when one goes into a space which is so obviously God-filled. That is something that I found very important and very attractive at that time. Under the tutelage of Fr. Kallistos I became Orthodox three years later, and I was ordained a priest some three years after that in January of 1976, by Continue reading “Fr. Meletios Weber, England: Through Oxford to Orthodoxy ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* England, USA & the Netherlands”